Wednesday, December 19, 2007

[C&P Galore] Will Malaysia become a Jihadistan?

Today, the Wahabbis are a pampered lot in Malaysia, and it is therefore small wonder that their ranks are growing. Becoming a fanatic may not make entry into heaven more easier after life passes on, but it certainly helps in creating a paradise on earth with the cash made available for such outlandish experiments.

Look around you, at the seat behind you on the Delhi-Hyderabad flight or the Kolkatta-Patna train. They are there with grim expressions, determined to avoid the pollution of physical or even verbal contact with those who are clearly not Wahabbi. Their deepest contempt is for those Muslims who are Sufi or Shia or males who refuse to wear a long beard and females without the hijab. “Do you consider yourself to be Muslim?”, they scornfully ask such individuals, who incidentally form the majority within the Malaysian Muslim community as well. Not that the government of the country that prides itself on being “Truly Asia” notices. Across the country, processed food producers—including the major international brands—are being forced to supply only “halal” items—never mind that as much as 70 per cent of Malaysia’s Muslims are non-Wahabbis who reject the dubious (and religiously unsound) interpretation of “halal” that the Wahabbi clerics give who have almost as much influence in Malaysia as they do in Saudi Arabia. Never mind that 30 per cent of the population (and over 60 per cent of the direct tax collections) comes from the ethnic Chinese, almost none of whom are Muslim, leave alone Wahabbist or Khomeinist, or that the remaining 10 per cent are almost entirely Hindus from India. From the time when Mahathir Mohammad began introducing “Wahabbi Lite” into his country in the 1980s, the rights of Shias, Sufis, women, moderate Muslims and non-Muslims have been taken away, as with the manner in which supermarkets are made to stock only items approved by the Wahabbi clerics.

Over the two decades, the proportion of Wahabbis to the total population has climbed from less than 5 per cent when Mahathir Mohammad took office in 1981 to nearly 20 per cent at present. Because of a proliferation of Wahabbi schools (and universities) that inculcate a feeling of separateness between Wahabbis and the others, Malaysia has become a factory for experiments such as a “Muslim cola” and even a “Muslim car”. Presumably the cola is so brewed as to turn into poison if consumed by a non-Wahabbi, while the automobile is so sensitive that it will refuse to start unless a certified Wahabbi turns on the ignition. In psychiatric textbooks there are descriptions for those who believe in such divisions between “Muslim” and non-Muslim cars and colas, but in Malaysia, those coming forward with such ideas are given access to bank funds and tax breaks that make each of them a very wealthy individual. Today, the Wahabbis are a pampered lot in Malaysia, and it is therefore small wonder that their ranks are growing. Becoming a fanatic may not make entry into heaven more easier after life passes on, but it certainly helps in creating a paradise on earth with the cash made available for such outlandish experiments. Although the Malaysian government claims to want to build up a knowledge society, the subjects being discussed in conferences given official blessings relate less to petraflops and gigabytes than to the proper way to wear a hijab or whether camel’s milk contains more spiritual value than that from cows.

Were Malaysia as separate from the rest of the region as the mindset of the Wahabbis that increasingly control policy in the country, it would be less of a security problem than it is now. The fact is that both the Malaysia-Indonesia border and the Thailand-Malaysia border have been penetrated by the Wahabbi International. The crossings created by this worldwide network of fanatics ensures that religious extremists can freely cross back and forth from Malaysia to Indonesia and Thailand. This writer has himself talked to six individuals who have crossed these borders without a visa, two of them without even a passport. It is almost as porous as the India-Bangladesh, India-Nepal and the India-Myanmar borders, where too the payment of a bribe can ensure passage for anyone with the money. In the case of the India-Nepal border, even a bribe is not necessary, as border controls are non-existent over much of the dividing line, which is the reason why Nepal has become an ISI safe haven almost as welcoming as Bangladesh for operations relating to India. It is a mystery why the Thai and Indonesian authorities are as blind to the danger posed by jihadi infiltration as the Sonia-led UPA is, unless the reason lies in the generous payments made by the Wahabbi International to those who assist in its activities. Because of the undocumented access that jihadis with bases in Malaysia have to Thailand and Indonesia, within both countries, Wahabbi networks are developing at an accelerated pace, and leading to acts of violence against both the local population and visitors. Thailand in particular has been ignoring this problem, even while the administration of Bambang Susilo Yudhyono in Indonesia is aware of the danger of their country going the way of Malaysia, and is seeking to curb the Wahabbists. However, in that country as well, the syncretic culture and tolerant tradition that has its roots in Java has been coming under sustained pressure from Wahabbis. Last year, it is estimated that as much as US$8 billion came to Indonesia to fund the activities of religious extremists and their support networks, a large chunk of it from the Gulf countries, in each of whom clusters of wealthy Wahabbis exist.


Read the rest of the article by M.D. Nalapat here.

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